Procedural Shorts, CE and Training for Veterinary Practice



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Bread Dough Toxicity in a Dog | VETgirl Veterinary CE Videos



Views:18909|Rating:4.65|View Time:3:2Minutes|Likes:80|Dislikes:6
In this VETgirl online veterinary CE video, we demonstrate how to treat raw bread dough toxicosis in a dog. While baked bread is not a poisoning issue, raw bread dough is due to the yeast within it. The warm stomach of the dog acts as an “artificial oven” as it is moist and warm. It results in carbon dioxide and ethanol formation as the yeast is metabolized. For this reason, raw bread dough toxicosis can result in both a gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV) and ethanol toxicosis! If the patient is completely asymptomatic, sometimes emesis induction can be performed. However, if the patient is already symptomatic, it is safer to gastric lavage with cold water (to slow the metabolism of the yeast). Sedation with an inflated endotracheal tube (ETT) to protect the airway is imperative. Using a large bore orogastric tube is imperative, as the thick doughy material must be removed. Ideally, we try to medically manage these cases, but rarely, surgery is required if the patient has a GDV or has a bezoar secondary to the dough (that can’t be removed by garage). Ethanol toxicosis can result in ataxia, drunkeness, hypotension, bradycardia, respiratory depression and hypoglycemia. Treatment includes dextrose supplementation (if hypoglycemic), blood glucose monitoring, thermoregulation, and symptomatic supportive care. Rarely, positive pressure ventilation may be necessary in patients with severe respiratory depression.

Thankfully, the prognosis for raw bread dough toxicosis in dogs is excellent. (Cats btw, are too smart to eat this stuff). When in doubt, contact ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for life-saving advice.

*Note: In the video, we erroneously state that yeast is metabolized to sugar, ethanol and CO2, but it’s actually that yeast works by consuming the sugar and then producing carbon dioxide and alcohol as byproducts.

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DISCLAIMER: Please note that this content has been made available for informational and educational purposes only. VETgirl, LLC. makes no representation or warranties regarding the accuracy, applicability, fitness, or completeness of this content. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Do not delay treatment based on this content, and when in doubt, seek veterinary professional advice.

Feline Urethral Obstruction (FUO) | How to unblock a cat | VETgirl Veterinary CE Videos



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This VETgirl online veterinary CE blog demonstrates how to unblock and treat a feline urethral obstruction (FUO). Treatment should include IV access, fluid resuscitation, sedation, analgesia, unblocking and life-saving supportive care.

Interested in learning more? Check out VETgirl ELITE, a subscription-based podcast, webinar & video service where you get over 24+ hours of RACE-approved online veterinary CE a year! More information can be found at www.vetgirlontherun.com.

DISCLAIMER: Please note that this content has been made available for informational and educational purposes only. VETgirl, LLC. makes no representation or warranties regarding the accuracy, applicability, fitness, or completeness of this content. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Do not delay treatment based on this content, and when in doubt, seek professional advice.

VETgirl Veterinary CE: A review of veterinary anesthesia machines



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Feel nervous about doing veterinary anesthesia? In this VETgirl online veterinary continuing education video, we review non-rebreathing and re-breathing anesthesia machines with veterinary technician anesthetist guru, Rachel, CVT. She’s a team lead at Animal Emergency & Referral Center of Minnesota and a veterinary technician specialty in anesthesia.

Learn more with VETgirl, a subscription-based podcast & webinar service offering RACE-approved, online veterinary continuing education. More information can be found at www.vetgirlontherun.com or on our social media channels!

DISCLAIMER: Please note that this content has been made available for informational and educational purposes only. VETgirl, LLC. makes no representation or warranties regarding the accuracy, applicability, fitness, or completeness of this content. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Do not delay treatment based on this content, and when in doubt, seek veterinary professional advice.

VETgirl Veterinary Ce: Veterinary Anesthesia Review: Part 2



Views:21087|Rating:4.93|View Time:14:58Minutes|Likes:222|Dislikes:3
Feel nervous about doing veterinary anesthesia? In PART II of this VETgirl online veterinary continuing education video, we review non-rebreathing and re-breathing anesthesia machines with veterinary technician anesthetist guru, Rachel, CVT. She’ll discuss how to use the Bain unit, which is commonly used for cats. Rachel is the team lead at Animal Emergency & Referral Center of Minnesota and a veterinary technician specialty in anesthesia.

Learn more with VETgirl, a subscription-based podcast & webinar service offering RACE-approved, online veterinary continuing education. More information can be found at www.vetgirlontherun.com or on our social media channels!

DISCLAIMER: Please note that this content has been made available for informational and educational purposes only. VETgirl, LLC. makes no representation or warranties regarding the accuracy, applicability, fitness, or completeness of this content. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Do not delay treatment based on this content, and when in doubt, seek veterinary professional advice.

How to place an intravenous (IV) catheter | VETgirl Veterinary CE Videos



Views:86039|Rating:4.78|View Time:3:34Minutes|Likes:578|Dislikes:26
In this VETgirl online veterinary continuing education video, we demonstrate how to place an intravenous (IV) catheter in a dog or cat. This procedure is performed commonly in veterinary practice, and veterinarians and veterinary technicians must feel comfortable with this procedure.

VETgirl is a subscription-based podcast & webinar service offering online veterinary continuing education. Learn through podcasts, webinars, videos, blogs and real-life rounds. Go to www.vetgirlontherun.com for more information.

DISCLAIMER: Please note that this content has been made available for informational and educational purposes only. VETgirl, LLC. makes no representation or warranties regarding the accuracy, applicability, fitness, or completeness of this content. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Do not delay treatment based on this content, and when in doubt, seek professional advice.