District Veterinary Nursing at the BVNA Congress 2018 ‘Fringe’



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The District Veterinary Nurse Fringe event at BVNA Congress (Saturday 13th October) aimed to showcase the role and future challenges through a series of short presentations including a number of case studies.
District Veterinary Nursing (DVN) is a new movement which has been attracting a lot of attention over the last few months. Pioneered by Registered Veterinary Nurse Carla Finzel, 4 years ago, Carla has proven the need for extending comprehensive veterinary nursing care right in the heart of the community and into the patient’s own home. This role works entirely through veterinary referral and with a close working relationship between owner, their vet and the district veterinary nurse.

The District Veterinary Nurse Development Group, a group of volunteers from inside and outside of the veterinary profession, was formed in Spring 2018 to support Carla to realise her vision of developing the role of the DVN at a national level, as extended outreach members of the veterinary team. While the Group’s work is in its infancy, they all share Carla’s powerful vision to bring veterinary nursing care to those who are unable to access the traditional veterinary practice setting for their pet’s ongoing care.

There are many reasons why owners do not visit the vet – it may simply be that the pet is fearful or more complex situations where the owner is unable to give the veterinary care required due to their own health or disability. The role of the DVN helps to address the Equality Act 2010 by removing some of the barriers to veterinary care and treatment caused by physical, intellectual, communication, learning, sensory or mental health disability.
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To quote two referring veterinary surgeons on their use of District Veterinary Nursing services:

** “… excellent service to help manage complex patients in their owners’ homes. It has been invaluable to aid our communication with owners who are often struggling to come to grips with on-going medication administration, giving injections at home, blood pressure monitoring in a calm environment, etc. This works very well with the practice: clearly communicating progress and our wishes to the owner.”

** ” … working in the community to enable and empower owners to care for their unwell pets at home is invaluable. We have had many cases where this has been instrumental in getting patients home from our hospital much sooner than would have been possible without assistance and support. The animals thrive in their home environment and the owners value the precious time with their companions, particularly if their pets are receiving palliative care.
But, even more importantly, there is help for those who are physically not capable of dealing with an unwell pet: owners with dementia, elderly owners learning to give insulin to a diabetic patient, owners with disabilities and owners who are anxious about how to administer medications, injections and tube feeds. As vets, this is our eyes and ears in the community and our go to whenever someone needs a little help, guidance and a kind ear.
The District Veterinary Nursing movement seems a trivial concept but has a huge impact on the wellbeing of owners and animals within our society.”
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The role of the District Veterinary Nurse is far removed from the more familiar term of a mobile nurse. This role encompasses intensive care nursing, specialist clinics, palliative nursing care and owner coaching, support and mentoring – all under the direction of the referring vet.

The DVN BVNA Fringe event aimed to showcase the role and future challenges through a series of short presentations including a number of case studies. Speakers explored: ‘What is a District Veterinary Nurse’, Carla Finzel RVN; ‘Developing the role of the District Veterinary Nurse’, Debbie Gray RVN; ‘Supporting the Human-Animal Bond’, Belinda Johnston MRCVS and ‘Professional considerations now and in the future’, Jill Macdonald RVN. Delegates went on to discuss this emerging role through an informal forum at the end of the short presentations, led by Dot Creighton RVN.

The Group believes that District Veterinary Nursing is an important missing link between patient welfare and access to veterinary care. Arguably it is needed to help protect the animal owner bond, to challenge traditional veterinary practice centred provision, to grow new veterinary nursing skill sets, to form new career pathways and improve veterinary nurse retention.

Contact us: [email protected]

Vision and Aims of District Veterinary Nurse Group:

*Please help us crowd-fund the District Veterinary Nurse campaign:
JustGiving.com/Crowdfunding/Carla-Finzel

How To Treat Fleas In Young Kittens And Nursing Mothers | How To Get Rid Of Fleas on Kittens



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Welcome to Pets and Animals YouTube Channel. Here you’ll find a lot of information about Animals and Pets.
Disclaimer: The materials and the information contained on Pets and Animals channel are provided for general and educational purposes only and do not constitute any legal, medical or other professional advice on any subject matter. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any disease. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new diet or treatment and with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition of Your Pet. If you have or suspect that your pet or animal have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provider.
Source: Images licensed under CC

The Cute Newborn Sphynx kittens purring and nursing / DonSphynx



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Don Sphynx join our family:
🔽🔽🔽🔽
The mother ▪ Pūkė

The daughter ▪ Bandita

The daughter ▪ Chikita

The Boy ▪ Rango

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Where They Came From…
◽◽◽
The Don Spynx is a mostly hairless cat breed of Russian origin. This breed started in 1987 with the discovery of a hairless cat in the Russian city of Rostov-on-Don by cat breeder Elena Kovaleva.

How they looks…
◽◽◽
These medium-sized, muscular cats have little to no hair and wrinkled skin. Their feet are oval-shaped with long, slim, webbed toes. Their heads are shaped like a wedge and are flanked by long, large ears and almond-shaped eyes. The eyes can be a variety of colors.

How Friendly Are They?
◽◽◽
Don Sphynx are friendly and intelligent, which makes them easy to train. They are also inquisitive, affectionate and social cats who like being around people and other pets — though they might not be friendly to other cats sometimes.

Don sphynx do not do well when left alone for a long time. They demand lots of attention and interaction, so they’re not recommended for anyone getting a cat for the first time or for people who aren’t home for long stretches of time. The cats are very loyal — in fact, their loyalty is often compared to that of dogs.

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Veterinary Nursing Degree at Hartpury



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Unlock doors to your dream career as a veterinary nurse by studying at Hartpury.

If you want to pursue a rewarding career as an veterinary nurse, this exciting vocationally-based foundation degree will give you the specialist nursing techniques and knowledge in animal care and professional status you need.

360 View: Veterinary Nursing at SPC



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360 View: Veterinary Nursing at SPC
(formerly Veterinary Technology)

About St. Petersburg College:

In 1927, St. Petersburg College (then known as St. Petersburg Junior College) became Florida’s first private, non-profit, two-year school of higher learning located in downtown St. Petersburg. Full accreditation followed in 1931 and in 1948 SPC became a public college.

In June 2001, SPJC officially became St. Petersburg College when Florida’s governor signed legislation making it the first community college in Florida to offer four-year degrees. On Dec. 11, 2001, the college received the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools’ accreditation to offer courses leading to bachelor’s degrees.

In 2002, St. Petersburg College began offering courses leading to bachelor’s degrees in Education, Nursing and Technology Management. The college’s commitment to its two-year curriculum, which has earned it wide recognition and annually wins it high national rankings, remains as strong as ever.

Today, SPC has ten learning sites throughout Pinellas County and recently became the first college in Florida to offer a four-year degree in Dental Hygiene. This program’s offerings augment its two-year program, which has been in operation since 1963. SPC added four-year degrees in Veterinary Technology, Public Safety Administration and Orthotics and Prosthetics in 2005.

College Accreditation

St. Petersburg College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associates degrees and to offer courses leading to bachelor’s degrees in the following areas: Banking, Nursing, Business Administration, Orthotics & Prosthetics, Elementary/Secondary Education, Paralegal Studies. Educational Studies. Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certification. Dental Hygiene. Public Safety Administration. Health Services Administration. Sustainability Management. International Business. Technology Management. Management & Organizational Leadership. Veterinary Technology.
SPC also offers access to junior and senior level courses for bachelors and graduate degrees at the University Partnership Center. The UPC partners with the University of South Florida, University of South Florida at St. Petersburg, Eckerd College, University of Florida, Florida State University, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, University of Central Florida, Florida International University, Florida A&M University, Saint Leo University, Florida Gulf Coast University, Florida Institute of Technology, Barry University, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, Indiana University, and St. Petersburg College.

Veterinary Nursing Center



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Veterinary Nursing Center
(formerly the Veterinary Technology Center)

SPC’s $11 million, Veterinary Nursing facility boasts more than 32,000 square feet of state-of-the-art classrooms, labs, surgery and x-ray suites, kennels and offices. Located next door to Pinellas County Animal Services on Ulmerton Road, the convenient location will make it easy for SPC students to get valuable work experience and for county services to get a volunteer boost. SPC’s Veterinary Nursing Center was awarded LEED® Gold certification by the U.S. Green Building Council.

About St. Petersburg College:
In 1927, St. Petersburg College (then known as St. Petersburg Junior College) became Florida’s first private, non-profit, two-year school of higher learning located in downtown St. Petersburg. Full accreditation followed in 1931 and in 1948 SPC became a public college.
In June 2001, SPJC officially became St. Petersburg College when Florida’s governor signed legislation making it the first community college in Florida to offer four-year degrees. On Dec. 11, 2001, the college received the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools’ accreditation to offer courses leading to bachelor’s degrees.
In 2002, St. Petersburg College began offering courses leading to bachelor’s degrees in Education, Nursing and Technology Management. The college’s commitment to its two-year curriculum, which has earned it wide recognition and annually wins it high national rankings, remains as strong as ever.
Today, SPC has eight learning sites throughout Pinellas County and recently became the first college in Florida to offer a four-year degree in Dental Hygiene. This program’s offerings augment its two-year program, which has been in operation since 1963. SPC added four-year degrees in Veterinary Technology, Public Safety Administration and Orthotics and Prosthetics in 2005.
College Accreditation
St. Petersburg College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associates degrees and to offer courses leading to bachelor’s degrees in the following areas: Banking, Nursing, Business Administration, Orthotics & Prosthetics, Elementary/Secondary Education, Paralegal Studies. Educational Studies. Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certification. Dental Hygiene. Public Safety Administration. Health Services Administration. Sustainability Management. International Business. Technology Management. Management & Organizational Leadership. Veterinary Technology.
SPC also offers access to junior and senior level courses for bachelors and graduate degrees at the University Partnership Center. The UPC partners with the University of South Florida, University of South Florida at St. Petersburg, Eckerd College, University of Florida, Florida State University, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, University of Central Florida, Florida International University, Florida A&M University, Saint Leo University, Florida Gulf Coast University, Florida Institute of Technology, Barry University, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, Indiana University, and St. Petersburg College.

Indian Army Soldier Nursing Aasistant Veterinary Open Rally Bharti 2019 full details in hindi



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Indian army nursing assistant Veterinary Open Rally bharti 2019 how to join Army as a nursing veterinary

Age :- 17.6 to 23 years

Education :- 10+2 / Intermediate exam pass in Science
with Physics, Chemistry, Biology and English
with Min 50% marks in aggregate and min
40% in each subject. OR In case the
candidate has a BSc Degree with
(Botany/Zoology/Bio-Science) and English
the stipulation of percentage in class 12th is
waived off. However, the candidate should
have studied all the four specified subjects in
class 12 also

Height :- 169 cm

Weight :- 50 kg

Selection Process of nursing veterinary
1) physical test 1.6km running exam timing 6 minutes
2) medical test examination of veterinary
3) written exam and negative marking 0.25 with new syllabus
4) Final Merit and result
5) cut off written exam

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Study Veterinary Nursing | Waikato Institute of Technology | Wintec



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If you love animals, Wintec can help you make a career out of it. Whether it’s working in a veterinary clinic as a nurse, or caring for animals in catteries, kennels or pet retailers, Wintec can help you get where you want to be.

See our web page for more info:

See your future in Veterinary Nursing



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Former BHI Veterinary Nursing student Christina Mercuri talks about where her qualification has taken her since graduating.

More information about Box Hill Institute’s Veterinary Nursing courses is online at www.boxhill.edu.au/course/animal-studies/veterinary-nursing/.

Learn more about Box Hill Institute at:
www.boxhill.edu.au
www.facebook.com/boxhilltafe
www.twitter.com/boxhilltafe
www.instagram.com/boxhilltafe

GoPro: 24-Hr Kitten Nursery



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Kitten season is the time of year when cats give birth, flooding animal shelters and rescue groups across the nation with homeless litters… San Diego Humane Society’s Kitten Nursery cares for thousands of orphaned kittens every year. These neonatal kittens require 24-hour care that is unavailable anywhere else and before their kitten nursery program was established in 2008, kittens this young would be euthanized because of a lack of resources required to care for them.

Purrlease be a responsible pet owner and spay or neuter your fur babies and of course if you’re looking to add an additional family member, ADOPT don’t shop! 🙂

San Diego Humane Society:

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About Us:
I love cats! Cole and Marmalade are both rescued cats, I’ve been making cat videos since 2008, we do our best to entertain as well as educate… We aim to make a pawsitive difference in the world, we hope you can follow us on this purrfect journey 🙂