California limits pet store sales of cats, dogs and rabbits to rescue or shelter animals only



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California pet stores soon will be allowed to sell dogs, cats and rabbits only if they come from shelters or non-profit rescue organizations. Under legislation going into effect on January 1, store operators also will have to be able to provide records of origin for the animals or face a $500 penalty per animal.

Pet stores can only sell rescued dogs, cats and rabbits under new CA law



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Starting Jan. 1, California shelter animals may find new homes by way of a pet shop window. It’s because of a new state law that bans pet stores from selling a dog, cat or rabbit in a pet store unless it was obtained from a public animal control agency or shelter, society for the prevention of cruelty to animals shelter, humane society shelter or rescue group. Watch the video above for the full story.

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Rabbits Guinea pigs for sale pet market || exotic rabbit || #Guinea pigs for sale Rabbits Manglore



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Bunnies 4 Sale Friendliest rabbits for sale in manglore

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New California Law Says Pet Stores Can Only Sell Rescued Dogs, Cats And Rabbits | NBC Nightly News



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Animal advocates are hailing the new law as putting pet welfare over profit, as the Humane Society says most of the dogs in these stores come from puppy mills. Breeders are concerned that the law will hurt their business.

What Kinds of Toys Do Rabbits Like? | Pet Rabbits



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Pet Rabbit Essentials
Timothy Hay:
Comb to control shedding :
Clear Plastic Tubing – To protect the rabbit and the cords:
BOOK on Rabbit Care:
Bunny Harness:
Rabbit Food:

Check out Cool Pet Rabbit Toys
Beachcomber hat:
Mini Plastic Slinky:
Toy Plastic Keys:
Bunny Maze Haven:
Sunmaid Raisins :
Papaya Tablets:
Deluxe Rabbit Home:
Woven Grass Mat for Rabbits:
Bunny Chew Toy:
Roomba – To keep your home clean:

Watch more How to Take Care of a Pet Rabbit videos:

Speaker 1: So we’re going to be talking about bunny toys today.

Speaker 2: Okay.

Speaker 1: . . . and I brought some of my favorite, and I see you’ve brought some of your favorites.

Speaker 2: Yes, I did.

Speaker 1: And I brought my favorite toy at home, Bean, my personal little . . .

Speaker 2: Bean, being such a cutie pie, Netherland Dwarf.

Speaker 1: Netherland Dwarf, looks like a wild rabbit, but he’s not, and we’ll talk about that later.

Speaker 2: Okay.

Speaker 1: So what do you do for toys?

Speaker 2: All right, this is something, well, first of all, my rabbit is obsessed with these little beachcomber straw hats, you just plop it on the floor and they’ll chew it. Here’s one that she’s not quite finished with here, but sometimes it’s just completely gone, and they just like to chew on it.

Speaker 1: Will she go through the entire thing?

Speaker 2: The entire thing, yeah.

Speaker 1: So completely disappear.

Speaker 2: But you want to make sure it’s not treated, right?

Speaker 1: Yeah, if you can, with any straw toys. Some imports have bug sprays on them, or other kinds of little chemicals that you might want to avoid, and it’s best to try to find untreated ones. Although people have told me that they have bought the sprayed ones because of a regulation importing into the U.S., that they have to be sprayed with no ill-effects on the rabbits. I try to find untreated ones myself, just to be safe.

Speaker 2: Okay. Now here’s one that I like to make at home. What you need is you just need a toilet paper tube, a pair of scissors, and you’re going to fringe the edges, because this gives them a little, what do you call it, like not resistance.

Speaker 1: It gives them a little play, there’s a little play in cardboard that way so it’s not quite so stiff.

Speaker 2: Right.

Speaker 1: So that they can access what it’s going to go into it a little more easily. I’m guessing you’re going to stuff it the way we do.

Speaker 2: Right, and then you kind of do the edges like this. See, this is fun, this is fun, and then you just fill it with your favorite hay, it can be a treat hay, you want to use like a herb hay.

Speaker 1: This is Timothy Hay here, you don’t have to use Timothy Hay, but any grass hay is a good alternative, Timothy is a grass hay.

Speaker 2: A little dynamite stick, see? And then you just throw that around, and I mean hay will go all over your apartment, but, you know, if you love your rabbit, you don’t really care, and then you just play. I mean, it’s really a lot of fun, you want to play with that (?).

Speaker 1: And you can use paper towel rolls too if you want it longer.

Speaker 2: Yep, paper towels, right. That’s the other thing . . .

Speaker 1: We have here a slinky, which is great, a lot of rabbits love to grab the end of a slinky and toss it around. One thing you want to be really careful about, and this is a good rabbit to show it with, this size slinky and this size rabbit could be a bad combination, and that’s why we’re showing this. A smaller slinky is better for a smaller rabbit, because this size rabbit can get its head into this slinky. For many rabbits that won’t matter, but some rabbits will panic when they get their head into a slinky, and they don’t back out. So you want to be careful about the size, and make it appropriate to the size of the rabbit.

Speaker 2: And what about metal versus just plastic ones?

Speaker 1: I like plastic ones myself.

Speaker 2: Okay.

Speaker 1: I know some people have used metal ones, but I like plastic ones, they’re much more visible to me on the floor so that I don’t step on them when a rabbit’s on the floor playing with them.

Speaker 2: Also oatmeal, sometimes people take out the sides of the oatmeal, you know, canisters . . .

Speaker 1: Yeah.

Speaker 2: . . . and your rabbit can get stuck in that too, so.

Speaker 1: Yeah, any cani

California’s Pet Stores To Only Sell Rescue Cats, Dogs And Rabbits – News Today



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California’s Pet Stores To Only Sell Rescue Cats, Dogs And Rabbits – News Today
#California, #PetStoresToOnlySellRescueCatsDogsAndRabbits California is ringing in the new year as the first state in the country to ban stores from selling dogs, cats and rabbits that aren’t rescues.
The Pet Rescue and Adoption Act, which was signed into law by California Gov. Jerry Brown in 2017, will go into effect on Tuesday, Jan. 1.
The law requires all pet shops to identify the public animal control agency, shelter or rescue group that the animal came from. Such information must be on display on its cage or in its enclosure.
The stores must also give public animal control agencies and shelters periodic access to those records. Anyone found to violate the law would be subject to a $500 fine.
Zbynek Pospisil via Getty Images
California is becoming the first state in the country to ban stores from selling nonrescue dogs, cats and rabbits.
The law intends to promote the adoption of pets from shelters and to help stop supporting mass breeding facilities ― popularly known as “puppy mills” ― which often have deplorable and inhumane conditions.
“In many cases, puppy mills house animals in overcrowded and unsanitary conditions without adequate food, water, socialization or veterinary care,” a fact sheet for the legislation said. “As a result, animals bred in these facilities often face an array of health problems, including communicable diseases, behavioral issues and genetic disorders.”
The public will still be allowed to purchase dogs, cats and rabbits directly from private breeders.
The bill, A.B. 485, received strong support from animal welfare organizations like the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the Humane Society of the United States. According to the ASPCA, an estimated 1.5 million animals were euthanized in shelters in the U.S. in 2016.
Critics of the law expressed concern that it will make it harder for the public to find specific breeds and that it will put some shops out of business.
RELATED COVERAGE
California Close To Banning Pet Shop Sales Of Non-Rescue Cats, Dogs And Rabbits How Can You Tell If A Dog Rescue Group Is Legit? Hunky ‘Heartthrobs And Hound Dogs’ Calendar Raises Money For Dog Rescues

Can You Keep a Wild Rabbit as a Pet? | Pet Rabbits



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Pet Rabbit Essentials
Timothy Hay:
Comb to control shedding :
Clear Plastic Tubing – To protect the rabbit and the cords:
BOOK on Rabbit Care:
Bunny Harness:
Rabbit Food:

Check out Cool Pet Rabbit Toys
Beachcomber hat:
Mini Plastic Slinky:
Toy Plastic Keys:
Bunny Maze Haven:
Sunmaid Raisins :
Papaya Tablets:
Deluxe Rabbit Home:
Woven Grass Mat for Rabbits:
Bunny Chew Toy:
Roomba – To keep your home clean:

Watch more How to Take Care of a Pet Rabbit videos:

Speaker 1: A lot of people call during the Spring and Summer because they’ve come across a nest of wild baby rabbits. They assume that the mother has abandoned the babies. Usually that’s not the case and it’s usually not the case that the mother has been hit by a car or anything like that. In fact, rabbits don’t nurse their animals steadily the way dogs or cats do. They don’t stay with the babies. They will nurse their babies once, sometimes twice a day, just for a few minutes, and in five minutes a baby rabbit can actually consume 20% of its body weight in mother’s milk.

Speaker 2: Whoa.

Speaker 1: Typically the mother will come to the nest, quickly nurse the babies, and leave the nest. And this is a way of keeping predators away from the nest. So people will assume, when they find a nest of baby rabbits, that that nest has been abandoned by the mother and they’ll think this is a great opportunity to get to know wild rabbits first hand. They’ll bring them in the house and then they’ll call us and they’ll say, ‘How do you take care of a wild rabbit?’ And what people don’t understand, believe it or not, wild rabbits and domestic rabbits are not related. They can’t interbreed.

Speaker 2: Right.

Speaker 1: They’re different creatures and the care involved is completely different. So I always tell them to get in touch with the nearest licensed wildlife rehabilitator. It’s not even legal in most states to have a wild rabbit in your possession, so if in fact you have a baby rabbit, take it to a wildlife rehabilitator. Better yet, if you see a nest that you think has been abandoned, call a licensed wildlife rehabilitator and ask for advice about what you should do, rather than picking up the rabbits. A wild rabbit in possession in a household doesn’t live very long. People are not informed on how to take care of them. They don’t do well in captivity at all and you may be responsible for the rabbit’s death instead of for helping the rabbit, which is probably what you wanted to do. And the related issue to this is many people who buy rabbits for their children at Easter, or as birthday gifts or whatever, soon enough the child stops taking care of rabbit, which shouldn’t have been the child’s job to begin with, of course. But the child stops taking care of the rabbit and the parents, without thinking twice about it, let the rabbit go in the backyard.

Speaker 2: All the time.

Speaker 1: Yeah. I mean we hear about this all the time

Speaker 2: They just let it go.

Speaker 1: Yup. And they say that . . .

Speaker 2: It’ll be snatched like that.

Speaker 1: . . . I want him to join a wild family and have a chance to have his own family. And as I said, they don’t interbreed.

Speaker 2: They’re domesticated.

Speaker 1: They don’t join wild families. They’re domesticated. This particular rabbit I chose for this video, because he’s about the same color as a wild rabbit. Similar, that tweedy, outdoor look.

Speaker 2: Mm-hmm.

Speaker 1: So people, when they see this kind of rabbit outdoors, they may think it’s a wild rabbit. In fact, this is a Netherlands dwarf domestic rabbit. And they’re are differences. If you study the coloration carefully in pictures on the web you will see the differences but you’ll see that this rabbit has tiny ears. Wild rabbits don’t have tiny ears. This is a dwarf breed and this is a way that you can tell the difference between him and a wild rabbit. In any case, don’t let your rabbit go outdoors, and don’t attempt to keep a wild rabbit as a pet. You will insure the well being of both the domestic rabbit and the wild rabbit that way.

8 Common Myths about Rabbits | Pet Rabbits



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Pet Rabbit Essentials
Timothy Hay:
Comb to control shedding :
Clear Plastic Tubing – To protect the rabbit and the cords:
BOOK on Rabbit Care:
Bunny Harness:
Rabbit Food:

Check out Cool Pet Rabbit Toys
Beachcomber hat:
Mini Plastic Slinky:
Toy Plastic Keys:
Bunny Maze Haven:
Sunmaid Raisins :
Papaya Tablets:
Deluxe Rabbit Home:
Woven Grass Mat for Rabbits:
Bunny Chew Toy:
Roomba – To keep your home clean:

Watch more How to Take Care of a Pet Rabbit videos:

Let’s talk about some common rabbit myths and there are a lot of them. One
myth about rabbits that we encounter all the time is that people think
they’re low maintenance. They are not low maintenance. Once you’ve taken
care of a dog and a rabbit, you will know that a dog takes less time to
take care of than a rabbit does, because rabbits need to be cleaned. Their
cages need to be cleaned. They need to have exercise time outside their
cage. They need excellent veterinary care. It may take you longer to get to
the vet because you can’t just go to a dog and cat vet with a rabbit. You
have to go to a vet that knows about rabbits. These guys are not low
maintenance and that’s a major myth.

Another myth is that they have short lives. I know when I was a child,
people used to tell me that rabbits lived a couple years and by the time I
was an adult, it had gone up to five or six years. Then it became six or
seven years, then seven to nine years, then nine or ten years and now we
are routinely seeing rabbits live ten to twelve years and that’s a good
thing to know before you get a rabbit because this is not a short-lived
animal. This animal is going to be with you the same length of time that
your larger breeds of dogs are, so that’s a major myth to consider.

Another myth is that rabbits don’t need vet care. They do need vet care and
they need vet care by vets that know about rabbits. Since rabbits are not
routinely studied in veterinary medical school, it can be tricky for owners
to find what we call a “rabbit savvy vet”, a vet that has some experience
with rabbits and is willing to go to continuing education, workshops,
seminars, whatever to learn about rabbits. You have to find yourself a vet
like that and make sure that your rabbit is cared for by that vet.

Another myth is that rabbits are happiest out of doors and I think of
outdoor rabbits as similar to dogs who live in a cage in your backyard, or
in a doghouse in your backyard. There’s really no social interaction. When
a child first gets the rabbit, maybe he’s very happy to go outside and take
care of the rabbit for a short period of time, but out of sight, out of
mind and other interests come up and then that rabbit is relegated to an
isolated spot. It’s like keeping somebody in solitary confinement and the
rabbit also is subject to extremes of weather, to parasites, to predatory
animals, so it’s a myth that keeping rabbits outdoors is the best way to
keep them. In fact, they live long, happy lives, as I said ten to twelve
years, is what we’re seeing now and some live into their teens even, if
they’re kept indoors and cared for well.

Another myth about rabbits is that they love to be picked up and cuddled.
Rabbits actually are ground animals. They live on or under the ground and
they feel most comfortable when their feet are on the ground. That isn’t to
say that you can’t pick them up and cuddle them, it’s just to say that you
have to respect the rabbit’s desire to feel safe on the ground. These are
not animals that enjoy being toted around all day long by, even adults, but
certainly not by kids who don’t handle them as well or as easily as adults.

Another common myth is, ‘let’s get a rabbit because we only have a small
apartment and we don’t have a lot of space. Rabbits are small”. In fact,
even a small rabbit needs plenty of space to exercise. These hind legs are
really powerful and they’re made for jumping and running. You will never
get to enjoy the things we see in rabbits if you don’t give your rabbit the
space to exercise. So, the more room, the better, right? You want to get
your rabbit a nice, big exercise pen to live in and then you want to give
him out-of-pen exercise time in a nice, safe rabbit-proof area where you’ve
removed electrical wires and houseplants. So the myth of space is a biggie.
They need space.

Another myth is that rabbits smell. In fact, when a rabbit is spayed or
neutered (spayed f

How to Handle a Pet Rabbit | Pet Rabbits



Views:1165304|Rating:4.73|View Time:7:40Minutes|Likes:9506|Dislikes:535
Pet Rabbit Essentials
Timothy Hay:
Comb to control shedding :
Clear Plastic Tubing – To protect the rabbit and the cords:
BOOK on Rabbit Care:
Bunny Harness:
Rabbit Food:

Check out Cool Pet Rabbit Toys
Beachcomber hat:
Mini Plastic Slinky:
Toy Plastic Keys:
Bunny Maze Haven:
Sunmaid Raisins :
Papaya Tablets:
Deluxe Rabbit Home:
Woven Grass Mat for Rabbits:
Bunny Chew Toy:
Roomba – To keep your home clean:

Watch more How to Take Care of a Pet Rabbit videos:

Mary: How to handle your pet rabbit. This is a big deal. I see people all the time mishandling the rabbits so tell me. How do I, what’s the appropriate way?

Amy: Okay. Well when you first bring a rabbit into your home you want to give him time to chill. Most people don’t do that. They’re so excited about getting a rabbit. They want to pick him up. They want to cuddle him. They want to put him on their lap. But these are prey animals and anything grabbing a rabbit is a predator to a rabbit.

Mary: Right.

Amy: Nothing in nature picks up a rabbit. Not even its own mother in this kind of rabbit.

Mary: Okay.

Amy: They just don’t, they’re not easy creatures to handle. That isn’t to say that you can’t and that isn’t to say that they can’t be cuddled and all that. But you have to take it a little slowly with them.

Mary: Right.

Amy: So the best thing to do is set up the rabbit in a good sized cage like a puppy exercise pen. Give him room to move around. Give him a nice big litter box. This is before you handle him. And give him a couple days to chill out and get to know the environment. Get to know what it’s like when you walk by.

Mary: Okay.

Amy: Then, by the time you’re ready to handle him, he’ll be familiar with you.

Mary: Right.

Amy: Now, the best thing to do is to sit down in his cage with him, in his puppy pen with him. Read a book. Make a phone call. Text somebody.

Mary: Jeeze!

Amy: Just do things that have nothing to do with the rabbit so he has the opportunity to come over and sniff at you and climb into your lap if he wants to without hands grabbing him. Many of these animals, especially really little rabbits like this one, have been picked up so often that after awhile they just start to snark at your hands and nip at them because that’s the only way they can keep hands away from them.

Mary: Okay.

Amy: And then we work with them a long time to calm them down. So what you want to do when they’re accepting of handling is to take your hand and really slowly, bring it in from the side rather than from the front, rather than . . .

Mary: Because you want to approach on the side always.

Amy: Where the eye is because . . .

Mary: Where they can’t see, their eye is . . .

Amy: Because they can’t see directly in front of themselves. Rabbits have not a true blind spot but a functional blind spot right in front of them. And if you do this with your fist and put them between your eyes and look around you’ll get an impression. You won’t be able to see anything ahead of you. And that’s how rabbits are naturally. So you want to bring your hand in from the side, pause for a minute to give your rabbit a chance to decide whether he wants to be touched. If he doesn’t, move away. You move away.

Mary: You mean out of the house?

Amy: Move out of the house. Just move your hand away.

Mary: Okay.

Amy: That teaches your rabbit that you’re going to respect his space. That if he needs more space and more distance you will respect that. If you don’t do that the rabbit will develop a habit of moving away from you to get that distance.

Mary: Okay.

Amy: Once you persuade him that you will move away when you’re respecting his signals you remove his need to move away from you. Which is really great because you want him ultimately to come to you. So when you go to pick him up, what do you do? I’m going to take him out of here. This is a small rabbit and I have rather long fingers so I’m going to pick him up just this way to get him this far and put him here.

But when you’re picking up to carry him the safest way to carry him is what we call the football hold. Never pick up a rabbit by the ears. A lot of people years ago used to do that. Many people still grab them by the scruff and dangle them. But that skin wasn’t designed to hold the weight of a rabbit. It just wasn’t. It’s not comfortable for the rabbit. When you’re picking up a rabbit comfortably

What to Consider before Buying a Rabbit | Pet Rabbits



Views:575667|Rating:4.73|View Time:7:34Minutes|Likes:3657|Dislikes:207
Pet Rabbit Essentials
Timothy Hay:
Comb to control shedding :
Clear Plastic Tubing – To protect the rabbit and the cords:
BOOK on Rabbit Care:
Bunny Harness:
Rabbit Food:

Check out Cool Pet Rabbit Toys
Beachcomber hat:
Mini Plastic Slinky:
Toy Plastic Keys:
Bunny Maze Haven:
Sunmaid Raisins :
Papaya Tablets:
Deluxe Rabbit Home:
Woven Grass Mat for Rabbits:
Bunny Chew Toy:
Roomba – To keep your home clean:

Watch more How to Take Care of a Pet Rabbit videos:

Mary: Okay so we’re talking today about what to consider before acquiring a rabbit. And I say acquiring rather than buying because many people buy rabbits from stores not realizing that you can adopt them from shelters or rescue groups. Really important thing to know because there was many, many rabbits who needs homes that are available in your local shelter or rescue group. As you adopted.

Amy: I went…my first rabbit I bought in a pet shop and then…

Mary: Oh, no way.

Amy: …and then all the information they had for bunnies was wrong.

Mary: Yeah.

Amy: So that’s also…we can talk about that later.

Mary: Your second rabbit…

Amy: I adopted from…

Mary: House Rabbit Society, yeah. And Amy’s rabbit is a beautiful rabbit now aged…

Amy: 12.

Mary: …12 we think about 12 years old. So what do you need to think about before you get a rabbit? A main thing to think about is how much space you have in your home for the rabbit. Not only for cages which should be generous in size. We recommend at least four times the body length of the rabbit when he’s stretched out but also space to exercise the rabbit outside the cage. You will need a rabbit proofed area and we’re doing another video on rabbit proofing so you’ll have information on that. But you’ll need a nice safe area to exercise the rabbit in where he can’t chew things that will hurt him or get him in trouble. And you need a place that has traction. If you have bare floors the rabbit will never run the way he will when he has traction and that’s why we like to show these rugs. These are nice cotton washable rugs that you can buy in lots of different stores and put them on top of your other rugs or on top of wood floors. If they slide on your wood floors you want to get a non-skid piece of rubber. You can get these in the dishware section of almost any home goods store. Keep the rugs from sliding around, give the rabbits traction.

Amy: Because otherwise if they don’t they’re backs are so fragile that they could break their backs.

Mary: They can skid and hurt themselves when they’re running. Another thing to think about is, do you have kids? And a lot of people think of rabbits as low maintenance starter pets for kids or as animated stuffed toys and they’re really not. These are very fragile animals and they’re prey animals which means everybody else is lunch in nature. These are animals that are very easily frightened and kids are naturally exuberant and spontaneous and all those wonderful things but that’ not good for a prey animal it makes them feel unsafe and unstable.

Amy: So get rid of your kids.

Mary: Get rid of your kids. Wait until your kids are a little bit older rather than getting rabbits for young kids. That’s a big consideration before you acquire a rabbit. Another one is the amount of time you have to spend. A lot of people think because you don’t have to walk rabbits the way you walk dogs that it’s no serious time expenditure. Talk to me about time expenditure.

Amy: Right, well yeah.

Mary: You spend a significant amount of time with your rabbit every day.

Amy: Keep it down, keep it down. Yeah I’m lucky I’m home a lot.

Mary: Exercising and massaging. Yeah that’s something people need to understand though. And another consideration is money. Rabbits don’t get like rabies vaccines and other vaccines that some other animals get that are common pets but they require veterinary care and the veterinary care for rabbits is often more expensive than very care for dogs and cats. And a lot of people think they’re getting a low budget pet when they’re getting a rabbit and it’s not low budget. Here in the New York area, for example just to spay or neuter a rabbit the cost can range into several hundreds of dollars and it’s very hard to find low cost alternatives because you can’t get the kind of certificates for rabbits that you can for dogs and cat

Do Rabbits Need Veterinary Care? | Pet Rabbits



Views:42008|Rating:4.92|View Time:3:56Minutes|Likes:313|Dislikes:5
Pet Rabbit Essentials
Timothy Hay:
Comb to control shedding :
Clear Plastic Tubing – To protect the rabbit and the cords:
BOOK on Rabbit Care:
Bunny Harness:
Rabbit Food:

Check out Cool Pet Rabbit Toys
Beachcomber hat:
Mini Plastic Slinky:
Toy Plastic Keys:
Bunny Maze Haven:
Sunmaid Raisins :
Papaya Tablets:
Deluxe Rabbit Home:
Woven Grass Mat for Rabbits:
Bunny Chew Toy:
Roomba – To keep your home clean:

Watch more How to Take Care of a Pet Rabbit videos:

Mary: Does your rabbit need veterinarian care? The answer to that question is yes. We now have good, skilled rabbit savvy vets in various areas of the country and it’s really a good idea to have your rabbit visit those vets or visit one of those vets for what we call a well bunny visit.
What does a well bunny visit do for you? Got any idea?

Amy: I’m hanging on every word.

Mary: A well bunny visit allows your vet to see the bunny when he’s not sick. So the vet can see what’s normal for your bunny. His normal behavior, how he feels, his various body parts, how they feel, how his belly feels when he’s healthy. We encourage owners to do this about once a year. Just go to the vet, let the vet have a hands-on visit with your rabbit and write up a record. So that when you do have a problem, if you have a problem, the vet will know what was normal for your bunny have a good point of comparison.

Amy: And how do you know it’s a good. Because a lot of times they say exotic animals and that means, you know, parrots, rabbits, whatever. But sometimes they don’t really know anything about rabbits. So how do you know?

Mary: Yeah, and interestingly enough, the word specialist is regulated by the American Veterinary Medical Association. Veterinarians are not allowed to call themselves specialist unless they go through certain kinds of training. There is no such thing as a straight rabbit specialist. So when people come and say, ‘Well, I went to a rabbit specialist and now my rabbit is sicker than before,’ I always say, ‘Well, did the vet tell you he or she was a rabbit specialist?’ Well, that’s what the front desk said so you have to be really careful. There’s no such thing as a rabbit specialist. There are vets who have taken special training after vet school, continuing education workshops or courses to learn about rabbits and that’s terrific. That’s what you want. And when you want to find a rabbit vet the best thing you can do, well one of the best things you can do, is to go online and look for the Association of Exotic Mammal Veterinarians. And it’s abbreviated A-E-M-V. At their website they have a list of veterinarians who like seeing various species, whether they’re specialist or not. And by calling around you’re likely to find a vet in your area that has substantial experience with rabbits. You have to ask, though.

If you have a rabbit rescue organization in your area that’s a great way to find a rabbit vet because those people are bringing in rabbits all the time. And they’ll know what vets are best at what. And they’ll steer you accordingly. Some vets are really terrify at rabbit tooth problems, for example, and they’ll send you to those vets. Others are good at rabbit gut problems. Some are good at everything. Those vets are hard to find but they’re around and they should be looked for. So, yeah, find yourself a good rabbit vet and make sure you visit that rabbit vet about once a year. You don’t need to do it more than that.

Amy: Unless they’re elderly and need to go twice a year.

Mary: Well, yeah, once they’re elderly they’re already at a stage in their life, like humans, where you do want to go more often. You want to have a checkup more often. There’s real value, when the vet tries to ask you to have things done for example. A lot of people resent that and they say, ‘Oh, he was trying to get money out of me. Because he tried to tell me I needed a blood test done on my rabbit.’ That’s not something the vet is trying to get money out of you for. If the vet takes a blood test from a healthy rabbit it’s fantastic information because now the vet has a series of normals. And if anything varies from that at a later date the vet can look back and say, ‘Well, on this date the rabbit’s kidney values were this and now they’re this.’ And that’s really useful information to have if you’re treating a sick rabbit. So, you know, do go in for a well bunny visit. Let your

PDSA – 100 years of helping pets



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PDSA has been a lifeline for sick and injured pets since 1917. In that time we’ve provided a staggering 100 million free treatments to more than 20 million pets.

Our veterinary expertise and comprehensive education programme means that we touch the lives of more pets and owners than any other pet welfare organisation. And we owe it all to one truly inspirational woman: PDSA’s founder, Maria Dickin CBE.

Find out more about the charity and its work over the years at www.pdsa.org.uk/pdsa100

#PDSA100

Baby Bunny Rabbits in Pet Store



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Some baby bunny rabbits in a Petco in Binghamton, New York, walking around and eating and being cute, furry, and soft. It is better to adopt instead of buying from a pet store. Here’s a video with some good information about getting a pet rabbit: